Digging with the Autospade

Digging with the Autospade

Using the Autospade is easy but a few tips will help you on your way . . .

Create a trench

It’s essential to create a digging trench, which allows the Auto-spade to throw the soil forward. The trench also allows the opportunity to dig in some muck.

Angle the blade

Take a spit as you would with a normal spade. Enter the blade at a backward angle. As a guide, the footplate should end parallel to the ground.

Angle the blade

Push the footplate fully to the ground

Use the footplate to press home the blade until it’s full-depth and the anchor plate is grounded. This allows the spade to pivot.

Push the footplate fully to the ground

Ease forward to loosen the spit

Ease the handle forward to loosen the spit and engage the anchor plate. This is vital on heavy or hard ground, but won’t be necessary on well dug ground.

Ease forward to loosen the spit

Pull back to toss the soil

Pull firmly back on the handle and the main spring will release, tossing the soil forward. The soil will invert onto the wall of the trench and with practice, you will become accomplished at tossing the soil to a distance and position that develops an even row of digging.

Pull back to toss the soil

Swing to the next spit

Don’t spear the Autospade into the ground, just swing the spade from one spit to the next.

Breaking new or hard ground

In new or hard ground a trench is vital, without it you will break the spade.
Under no circumstances should you plunge the autospade blade into hard ground and pull back on the handle. The shaft or spring will bend or break.
Always start with a trench and then take small bites of 2″ – 3″ (50mm – 75mm). Don’t forget to loosen the spit by pushing forward.

Breaking new or hard ground

Dig only in cultivated ground

The shaft and spring mechanism are not appropriate for tackling large stones, tree roots or uncultivated earth. If you encounter these then tackle the job with the correct tool; a heavy-duty spade, pick or adze.

Back strain

Warm up

Gardening is a great outdoor exercise, with digging perhaps the most energetic activity. If you suffer with your back, it’s a good idea to spend a couple of minutes warming up with some stretching exercises.

If you’re unsure what to do then see your local physiotherapist who will tailor exercises appropriate for your problem.

Backsaver Garden Tools Ltd are committed to offering a range of tools that help to reduce back strain when gardening. If you suffer with your back, then we hope our excellent tools will help in allowing you to continue to enjoy the wonderful pleasures of gardening.